Atoms
//Tampan 216//, Paminggir people. Lampung region of Sumatra, 19th century, 55 x 59 cm. From the library of Darwin Sjamsudin, Jakarta. Photograph by D Dunlop.
Tampan 216, Paminggir people. Lampung region of Sumatra, 19th century, 55 x 59 cm. From the library of Darwin Sjamsudin, Jakarta. Photograph by D Dunlop.
Click on this image for a quick tour around a generic model of an atomic.
Click on this image for a quick tour around a generic model of an atomic.

When space-time events are objectified, they are called atoms, and often generically represented using the letter $\mathbf{A}$. So when we call a particle an atom, we presume that a well-defined position $\overline{r}$, a well-known time of occurrence $t$, and a definite trajectory $\Psi \left( \bar{r}, t \right)$ can, in principle, be assigned to $\mathbf{A}$'s events without making further assumptions.

Thus atoms are objectified from an eight-part suite of sub-atomic events. The accompanying movie shows all eight sub-atomic events and their space-time relationships with each other. It makes a generic model of an atom. The space-time style of description can also be extended to atomic variations and composites like molecules, ions and isotopes.

Moreover, if we do make additonal assumptions, then some probabilistic space-time descriptions can be constructed for protons and electrons. For more detail, see this article on sub-atomic particle models.

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