Atoms
//Tampan 216//, Paminggir people. Lampung region of Sumatra, 19th century, 55 x 59 cm. From the library of Darwin Sjamsudin, Jakarta. Photograph by D Dunlop.
Tampan 216, Paminggir people. Lampung region of Sumatra, 19th century, 55 x 59 cm. From the library of Darwin Sjamsudin, Jakarta. Photograph by D Dunlop.
Click on this image for a quick tour around a generic model of an atomic.
Click on this image for a quick tour around a generic model of an atomic.

When space-time events are objectified, they are called atoms, and often generically represented using the letter $\mathbf{A}$. So when we call a particle an atom, we presume that a well-defined position $\overline{r}$, a well-known time of occurrence $t$, and a definite trajectory $\Psi \left( \bar{r}, t \right)$ can, in principle, be assigned to $\mathbf{A}$'s events without making further assumptions. Thus atoms are objectified from an eight-part suite of sub-atomic events.

The accompanying movie shows all eight sub-atomic events and their space-time relationships with each other. It makes a generic model of an atom. The space-time style of description can be extended to atomic composites like molecules. And, if we do make additonal assumptions, then some probabilistic descriptions can be made for particles smaller than atoms. See the article sub-atomic particle models for more.

Right.png Next step: molecules and molecular bonds.
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