Hypothesis of Conjugate Symmetry
//Bead Panel// from a baby carrier, Bahau people, Borneo 20th century, 34 x 25 cm. From the Teo Family collection, Kuching. Photograph by D Dunlop.
Bead Panel from a baby carrier, Bahau people, Borneo 20th century, 34 x 25 cm. From the Teo Family collection, Kuching. Photograph by D Dunlop.

If feeling a sensation on the left side always presents the same sensory magnitude as feeling it on the right, then the specific energy $\hat{E}$ of an odd conjugate seed is equal to the specific energy of an ordinary conjugate seed. And if their urgency is the same, then the vis viva $\, \hat{K}$ of an odd conjugate seed is equal to that of an ordinary conjugate seed. The hypothesis of conjugate symmetry is an assumption that all sensory experience is perfectly balanced in this way.

Hypothesis of
Conjugate Symmetry
$\hat{E} \, \left( \sf{O} \right) = \hat{E} \, \left( \sf{\overline{O}} \right)$
and
$\hat{K} \, \left( \sf{O} \right) = \hat{K} \, \left( \sf{\overline{O}} \right)$
Conjugate symmetry relieves us from having to pay very much attention to whether a sensation is experienced on the left or right side. The assumption simplifies analysis because it makes ordinary-quarks and anti-quarks much the same as each other; if left and right get mixed-up, the outcome of any calculation using the specific energy or vis viva remains unchanged. Using this assumption is a way of objectifying the description of sensation. The hypothesis of conjugate symmetry implies that a particle and its corresponding anti-particle have the same mass. This has been experimentally tested.1 For protons $\left| \; m^{\sf{p^{+}}} \! - m^{\sf{p^{-}}} \right| \, / \, m^{\sf{p}^{+}} < 6\sf{x}10^{-8}$ and for electrons the ratio is less than eight parts in a billion.
Right.png Next step: quarks are indestructible.
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