Quarks are Indestructible

To satisfy Anaxagorean narrative conventions, Cantor's definition of a set, and Pauli's exclusion principle, we require that seeds are perfectly distinct. Therefore seed counts always report a positive integer or zero, not fractions or negative numbers. Quark coefficients are always integers too because quarks are defined by pairs of seeds. Moreover, a logical style of description requires that seeds are indestructible. And thus quarks must be indestructible too because by definition seed-pairs are permanently bound together.

//Bead Panel// from a baby carrier, Basap people. Borneo 19th century, 27 x 19 cm. From the Teo Family collection, Kuching. Photograph by D Dunlop.
Bead Panel from a baby carrier, Basap people. Borneo 19th century, 27 x 19 cm. From the Teo Family collection, Kuching. Photograph by D Dunlop.

So the overall quantity and quality of the quarks in a description cannot change. Whenever some compound quarks $\mathbb{X}$, $\mathbb{Y}$ and $\mathbb{Z}$ are combined or decomposed, if

$\mathbb{X} + \mathbb{Y} \leftrightarrow \mathbb{Z}$

then the coefficients of any type of quark q are related as

$n^{\sf{q}} \left( \mathbb{X} \right) + n^{\sf{q}} \left( \mathbb{Y} \right) = n^{\sf{q}} \left( \mathbb{Z} \right)$

And a sum over all types of quarks N is constrained as

$N^{\mathbb{X} } + N ^{ \mathbb{Y} } = N ^{ \mathbb{Z} }$

These relationships are the logical basis for a variety of conservation laws that are found throughout physics. We often refer back to them in the articles that follow.

Right.png Next step: identifying compound quarks.
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